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Dr. Jill Heathcock

Assistant Professor                                                              

Director of the Infant Lab at Ohio State University

Contact Information:

Jill C. Heathcock, MPT, PhD
516 Atwell Hall
The Ohio State University
453 West Tenth Avenue
Columbus, OH 43210
Telephone: 614-292-2397
Fax: 614-292-0210
Heathcock.2@osu.edu


Education

The University of Dayton
Exercise Science and Pre-PT 
BS, 1998

The University of Delaware
Physical Therapy                                           
MPT, 2001
 
The University of Delaware
Biomechanics and Movement Science
PhD, 2006

The University of Michigan
Infant Motor Development
Post-Doctoral Fellowship

Clinical Expertise:

Pediatrics
Motor development

Teaching Responsibilities:

Pediatrics

Professional Activities:

Member, American Physical Therapy Association (APTA)
Member, Society for Neuroscience 
Member, North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity (NASPSPA)
Member, International Society for Infant Studies (ISIS)

Scholarly Activity:

My scholarship focuses on how young infants learn to use their spontaneous movements to control and interact with their environment. I am specifically interested in developing evidence-based intervention programs for very young infants at risk for long-term movement impairment and disability.  My work (so far) has focused on infants born premature and infants with Spina bifida. Currently, I am involved in projects that look at the effects of training early gross motor skills, such as reaching, in infants at risk for cerebral palsy, and how enhanced sensory input influences lower extremity coordination on a treadmill in infants at risk for cerebral palsy and infants with Spina bifida.  infantlab.osu.edu (If you have problems viewing with Internet Explorer 7, please open with Mozilla Firefox).

Awards/Recognition:

2006 Dissertation Award, Pediatrics Section APTA
2005 Dorothy Briggs Memorial Scientific Inquiry Award, APTA

Publications:

Heathcock JC. Invited Commentary on "Gastrocnemius-Soleus Muscle Tendon Unit Changes Over the First 12 Weeks of Adjusted Age in Infants Born Preterm." Physical Therapy Journal. 2009, February; 89(2) p. e1

Heathcock JC, Lobo M, Galloway JC. Movement Training Advances the Emergence of Reaching in Infants Born at Less That 33 Weeks of Gestational Age: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Physical Therapy. 2008 Mar; 88(3).

Galloway JC, Bhat A, Heathcock JC, and Manal K. Shoulder and elbow joint power differ as a general feature of vertical arm movements. Experimental Brain Research. 2004 Aug; 157(3):391-396.

Heathcock JC, Bhat AN, Lobo MA, and Galloway JC. The performance of infants born preterm and full-term in the mobile paradigm: learning and memory. Physical Therapy. 2004 Sep; 84(9):808-21.

Heathcock JC, Bhat AN, Lobo MA, and Galloway JC. The relative kicking frequency of infants born full-term and preterm during learning, short-term and long-term memory periods of the mobile paradigm. Physical Therapy.  2005 Jan; 85(1):8-18.

Bhat A, Heathcock JC, and Galloway JC. Toy-oriented changes in hand and joint kinematics during the emergence of purposeful reaching.  Infant Behavior and Development.  2005; 28: 445-465.

Fun Facts:

My husband and I have a daughter who is just over 1 year.  We moved here in July and are busy learning about OSU and Columbus

Journal Club Articles

(December 1 @ 9:30)