Ohio State Navbar

Sign In

Ob/Gyn Clinical Trials and Other Research Studies

Questions on Ob/Gyn Clinical Trials and Research
614-293-0075

About Ob/Gyn Clinical Trials and Other Research Studies at Ohio State

 
We currently manage more than 55 clinical trials and other studies funded by Bayer, Merck, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute and National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, among others.
 
Our Clinical Trials Office (CTO) was established in 1997 and is led by Lisa Keder, MD. The CTO has participated in numerous large-scale, industry-sponsored, multicenter trials and has maintained subject continuation rates greater than 90% and data collection close to 100%.
 
  

Prepregnancy and Healthy Women Clinical Trials and Studies

 
Title: A Phase 3, Randomized, Multicenter, Open-Label Study of a Levonorgestrel-Releasing Intrauterine System (20 mcg/day) and Mirena® for Long-Term, Reversible Contraception up to Five Years
Purpose of the Study: To assess the efficacy of a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG20) in women of child-bearing ability who request long-term, reversible contraception.
Description: The study is a randomized, multicenter, open-label evaluation of the efficacy of a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (IUS). A marketed IUS (Mirena) is being used as a comparator. The Mirena arm of the study is closed to randomization and the experimental IUS arm is being actively recruited. Women will be evaluated at follow-up clinic visits for up to 60 months. There will also be follow-up telephone calls/emails. Women will complete a daily diary.
Eligibility Criteria: Women who are healthy and between the years of 16-45 will be included. Women must be in a mutually monogamous relationship for at least six months and be regularly sexually active. They must be willing to rely on the study IUS as the primary method of contraception during the study. Women will be excluded if they are breastfeeding, currently pregnant or have used Depo-Provera within the past nine months.
Study Status: Closed to enrollment.
Principal Investigator: Lisa Keder, MD, MPH
Contact: Kathy Martin, RN, MS, CNP - Clinical Research Specialist, Certified Nurse Practitioner Kathryn.martin@osumc.edu
Funding: Medicines360, Inc.
 
Title: FOCUS: International Active Surveillance Study – Folate in Oral Contraceptives Utilization Study
Purpose of the Study: Researchers from Europe and the United States are studying if there are differences in the chance of health-related risks or benefits associated with oral contraceptives among women. The primary objective of this study is to assess the risks of short- and long-term use of oral contraceptives plus folate, in comparison to established oral contraceptives.
Description: Women will be recruited from physician offices and the OSU Wexner Medical Center Ob/Gyn Clinic to complete a short questionnaire about their medical history. Women complete the questionnaire and return it to the sponsor in a self-addressed stamped envelope. By mail, the sponsor will send a short follow-up survey every 6 – 12 months for at least four years to monitor any changes in health and well-being.
Eligibility Criteria: Women age 12 and older who are ordered a combined oral contraceptive are eligible. The women may be first-time users of oral contraceptives or they may be switching from one pill to another. Also included are those women restarting an oral contraceptive prescription.
Study Status: Open to enrollment.
Principal Investigator: Lisa Keder, MD, MPH
Contact: Kathy Martin, RN, MS, CNP - Clinical Research Specialist, Certified Nurse Practitioner Kathryn.martin@osumc.edu
Funding: Juergen Dinger, MD, MPH (Berlin, Germany)
 
Title: In Women, Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (AUB) Complicates Use of Long-Term Progestin-Only Contraceptive (LTPOC) Agents
Purpose of the Study: To identify and assess mechanisms in the endometrium that mediate AUB.
Description: LTPOCs are safe, effective and inexpensive and therefore ideal for use by women in developing countries. They are discontinued primarily because of AUB, which does not compromise health, but is a source of severe annoyance and in some societies of religious taboo. Unlike menstrual bleeding, AUB stems from distended, fragile endometrial microvessels. Laser Doppler Fluxmitry measurements indicate that LTPOC administration to women markedly reduces utero-placental blood flow eliciting local hypoxia and generation of microvessel damaging reactive oxygen species. The resulting increase in microvascular permeability increases contact of factor VII from the circulation to Tissue Factor (TF), expressed by surrounding highly decidualized endometrial stromal cells. Excess generation of thrombin by TF acts as an autocrine/paracrine stimulator of decidualized endometrial stromal cells to promote AUB via increased expression of: 1) vascular endothelial growth factor, which further increases microvascular permeability; and 2) Matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 3, which degrade the extracellular matrix microvascular support structure.
Eligibility Criteria: Non-applicable.
Study Status: Closed.
Principal Investigator: Charles Lockwood, MD Contact: Dr. Charles Lockwood, Charles.Lockwood@osumc.edu, Dr. Frederick Schatz, Frederick.Schatz@osumc.edu
Funding: NIH
 

Pregnancy Clinical Trials and Studies

 
Title: An Observational Study of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) in Pregnancy
Purpose: To understand risk factors associated with mother to child transmission of HCV.
Description: It is known that almost all cases of pediatric HCV are the result of transmission of the HCV infection from mother to baby. However, it is unclear what the actual rate of vertical transmission is or if interventions such as a cesarean delivery do indeed protect infants from becoming infected. Women presenting for prenatal care before 23 weeks gestation are eligible for HCV screening. Women who are identified as HCV positive will be asked to participate in the observational study as a case. These women will have blood drawn at set intervals during pregnancy and at delivery and their babies will have blood drawn at their regular follow up appointments. Women who are identified as HCV negative may be asked to participate in the observational study to provide a comparison group.
Eligibility Criteria: To be screened for the observational study, women must be between the ages of 18-48 and be pregnant with one baby. The screening blood test must be performed by 23 weeks gestation. Women who are identified to be positive for HCV will be asked to participate in the observational study. Women who are identified to be negative may be contacted to participate in the observational study.
Study Status: Open and enrolling
Principal Investigator: Mona Prasad, DO, MPH
Contact Information: Anna Bartholomew, RN, BSN, 614-685-3229
Funding: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)
 
Title: A Randomized Trial of Induction Versus Expectant Management
Purpose: To determine whether elective induction of labor at 39 weeks, compared with expectant management, reduces the risk of severe neonatal morbidity and perinatal mortality among nulliparous women with singleton uncomplicated term pregnancies.
Description: Recently, several retrospective studies have been completed that show that maternal and perinatal complications increase with gestational age after 37-38 weeks. This led to questions regarding the common practice of waiting until 41 weeks gestation to induce mothers who have uncomplicated pregnancies, and if this is practice is the best for the mother and the infant. Women who consent for enrollment will be randomized into one of two groups: elective induction between 39 weeks 39 weeks 4 days gestation or expectant management in which the earliest elective induction is 40 weeks 5 days gestation.
Eligibility Criteria: Women must be 18years of age, pregnant with a single fetus, pregnant for the first time (previous losses before 20 weeks are acceptable) and be between 34 weeks and 38 weeks 6 days gestation, without any major health complications.
Study Status: Open and enrolling
Principal Investigator: Catalin Buhimschi, MD
Contact Information: Anna Bartholomew, RN, BSN, 614-685-3229
Funding: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)
 
Title: Natural history of stage I twin-twin transfusion
Purpose: To learn about the features associated with disease progression, stabilization or regression and to compare neonatal outcomes from various treatments.
Description: Information from the medical charts of affected women and their newborns will be collected and
Eligibility Criteria: Women diagnosed at Ohio State with stage I twin to twin transfusion
Study Status: Open and enrolling
Principal Investigator: Britton Rink, MS, MD
Contact Information: Karen Rossi 614-293-8083
Sponsor: North American Fetal Treatment Network
 
Title: Immune Responses to the Flu Shot during Pregnancy
Purpose: This study will examine how life factors including everyday stress and weight affect immune responses to the flu shot among pregnant women.
Description: This study will include approximately 240 pregnant women who will complete two study visits at the OSU Wexner Medical Center. Visits will occur approximately one month apart and will require a total time commitment of 1 1/2-2 hours. At each study visit, participants provide a small blood sample and complete questionnaires assessing their health, health behaviors, life stress and mood. At Visit 1, a flu shot will be administered. Finally, a blood sample will be collected from mothers and cord blood will be collected from their babies during the hospital stay at the time of delivery. Participants will receive up to $125 in cash.
Eligibility Criteria: Healthy pregnant women who are less than 29 weeks pregnant and at least 18 years of age are eligible to participate. Women must be planning to delivery at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center.
Study Status: Open and currently enrolling.
Principal Investigator: Lisa Christian, PhD
Contact: Stress and Health in Pregnancy research Program at 614-293-5262 or email at stressandpregnancy@osumc.edu with questions. To apply, visit our website.
Funding: The National Institute for Nursing Research (NINR)
 
Title: Long-Term Follow-Up of Children Diagnosed With Urologic or Bladder Disorders Before Birth
Purpose: To learn more about the outcomes of children diagnosed before birth with obstructive problems in the urologic system as related to any fetal treatment that is performed.
Description: Mothers who choose to participate in this study agree to provide the researchers with information about their surviving child until four years of age. Information about all health care needed by the affected child is gathered by phone or from medical records. No extra appointments are needed for this observational study.
Eligibility Criteria: Found to have an obstruction in the renal system during a pregnancy that is being care for at OSU Wexner Medical Center and delivery of a surviving child who goes home.
Study Status: Open and enrolling.
Principal Investigator: Richard O’Shaughnessy, MD
Contact: Karen Rossi, RN, 614-293-8083
 
Title: Antibodies in Pregnancy
Purpose: To learn more about the effect of antibodies on fetuses and newborns so the best treatments can be provided.
Description: All information about the routine clinical care provided during pregnancy and after birth to manage alloimmunization (antibodies) is collected. This study includes information on all pregnancies managed at OSU Wexner Medical Center since 1959, making it the largest source of information in the United States.
Eligibility Criteria: Patients who have a blood sample analyzed at OSU Wexner Medical Center Prenatal Reference Laboratory are included.
Study Status: Open and enrolling.
Principal Investigator: Richard O’Shaughnessy, MD
Contact: Karen Rossi, RN, 614-293-8083
 
Title: Outcomes of Twin-Twin transfusion
Purpose: To study the effects of treatment provided during pregnancy for twin-twin transfusion.
Description: Information about the growth and development and healthcare needs of surviving infants is gathered from phone calls and medical records until two years of age.
Eligibility Criteria: Diagnosis and treatment at OSU Wexner Medical Center with twin-twin transfusion.
Study Status: Open and enrolling.
Principal Investigator: Richard O’Shaughnessy, MD
Contact: Karen Rossi, RN, 614-293-8083
 
Title: Antenatal Late Preterm Steroids (ALPS): A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial
Purpose: To evaluate whether antenatal corticosteroids can decrease the rate of respiratory complications in the baby, thus decreasing the rate of NICU admissions and improving short-term outcomes in the late-preterm infant.
Description: Women who consent for participation will receive two doses of betamethasone/placebo 24 hours apart. The study drug medication will be administered as an injection. Those with a planned delivery will receive study drug two to seven days prior to delivery.
Eligibility Criteria: Pregnant women ages 18-48 years with a singleton pregnancy and high probability of delivery in the late-preterm period (between 34 0/7 and 36 5/7 weeks).
Study Status: Open.
Principal Investigator: Mona Prasad, DO, MPH
Contact Information: Francee Johnson, RN, BSN, 614-293-5632
Funding: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)
 
Title: A Randomized Trial to Prevent Congenital Cytomegalovirus (CMV)
Purpose: To determine whether monthly maternal administration of CMV hyperimmune globulin during the entire pregnancy lowers the rate of congenital CMV infection.
Description: Cytomegalovirus is the most common congenital infection. Women presenting for prenatal care before 23 weeks’ gestation are eligible for CMV screening. Women who consent for screening will have a simple blood test performed at one of their routine prenatal visits. Women whose CMV screening identifies CMV infection during the current pregnancy will be asked to participate in the randomized trial. In the randomized trial, women will receive one of two monthly treatments until the end of pregnancy: IV CMV hyperimmune globulin or an identical-appearing placebo that contains no medication.
Eligibility Criteria: To be screened for the randomized trial, women must be between the ages of 18-48 and be pregnant with one baby. The screening blood test must be performed by 23 weeks in pregnancy. Women whose CMV screening testing identifies CMV infection during the current pregnancy will be asked to participate in the randomized trial.
Study Status: Opening soon.
Principal Investigator: Britton Rink, MD, MS
Contact Information: Francee Johnson, RN, BSN, 614-293-5632
Funding: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)
 
Title: nuMoM2B- Nulliparous Pregnancy Outcomes Study: Monitoring Mothers-to-be
Purpose: To collect information to find ways to identify possible pregnancy complications in women who have not had a previous pregnancy beyond 20 weeks.
Description: Women are enrolled early in pregnancy and undergo research assessments four times during the pregnancy. Conditions to be focused on are high blood pressure, babies who are born much too early and very small babies. Data are collected through interviews, self-completed data forms, ultrasound and biological specimens. Information is also collected from medical records during pregnancy and at the time of delivery.
Eligibility Criteria: Women must be at least 16 years of age and pregnant for the first time (may have up to three previous miscarriages, none beyond 20 weeks). Enrollment occurs between six weeks to 14 weeks into the pregnancy and women must intend to deliver at OSUWMC.
Study Status: Open.
Principal Investigator: Jay Iams, MD
Contact: Cheryl Latimer, RN, MS, CCRC, 614-293-3782
Funding: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)
 
Title: A Randomized Trial of Fetal ECG ST Segment and T Wave Analysis as an Adjunct to Electronic Fetal Heart Rate Monitoring (STAN)
Purpose: To test a new instrument, called a fetal STAN monitor, which may be used during labor to monitor the electrical activity of the baby’s heart. The goal for this study is to see if this monitor will have an impact on newborn health.
Description: The fetal STAN monitor has been approved by the FDA and is designed to help the doctor determine how well the baby is doing during labor. Currently doctors use the fetal heart rate and mother’s contraction pattern to determine how the baby is doing during labor. The fetal STAN monitor will additionally collect information on the electrical activity of the baby’s heart, giving physicians extra information to determine baby’s well-being. The monitor remains in place until delivery. Immediately after delivery, a small sample of blood will be taken from the umbilical cord to determine the level of oxygen in the baby’s blood. This blood is taken from a piece of umbilical cord cut between the baby and the placenta, so the baby will not feel discomfort. Information will be collected about how well mom and baby did during the hospital stay, and no follow-up is required after discharge.
Eligibility Criteria: To participate, women must be between ages 18-45, greater than 36 weeks pregnant and planning to have a vaginal delivery. They must also be pregnant with only one baby and have no history of uterine surgery.
Status: Open.
Principal Investigator: Katherine Strafford, MD
Contact Information: Francee Johnson, RN, BSN, 614-293-5632
Funding: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)
 
Title: Assessing Reproductive Health Care for Women
Purpose: To understand the facilitators and barriers to women in obtaining reproductive health care, with a specific emphasis on contraception. The hope is to identify attitudes, logistics, financial concerns, educational awareness, medical concerns and healthcare availability in relation to contraception use.
Description: We are enrolling 500 women of reproductive age who are considered high risk for premature deliveries and rapid repeat pregnancies. Initial interaction involves a brief assessment of birth history, a reproductive healthcare questionnaire and birth control education followed by assistance with a birth control plan. Participants will then be periodically contacted (one to five times) over the next two years to assess attitudes and challenges and offer assistance related to available birth control options. At the end of the two-year period, county and state health department records will be searched (per consent) to identify enrolled women who have had a preterm birth or rapid repeat pregnancy during the two-year period. This data will then be compared to the rates of rapid repeat pregnancies and preterm births in the county, state and nation. The plan is to use the results from this study to lead to more rigorous research designs on contraception use and adherence in the future.
Eligibility Criteria: Women who are at least 18 years old, have an increased risk of a preterm birth, have a history of rapid repeat pregnancy and/ or are considered low income (no insurance or public assistance). Preference will be given to mothers who reside in Franklin County, Ohio.
Study Status: Open.
Principal Investigator: Jay Iams, MD Contact: Tammy Johnson, RN, BSN, tammy.johnson@osumc.edu
Funding: NCH
 
Title: Systems Biology Approaches to Study Preterm Birth
Purpose: To use systems biology approaches to create models for preterm birth.
Description: This research proposal will utilize an interdisciplinary team of clinicians, basic scientists, bioinformatics specialists and mathematicians to tackle one of the most vexing problems facing the field of obstetrics – preterm birth. We will do this by using a well-defined cell culture model of human decidua (endometrium of pregnancy) to profile the expression of both mRNAs that encode proteins and non-coding RNAs (microRNAs) that ‘fine-tune’ the expression of the mRNAs, following that with inflammatory substances and/or hormones that counteract such stimuli. These data will be used to perform computational modeling so that important insights into the regulatory control of induced RNA species can be achieved; these models can then be used to better predict those who will experience a preterm delivery, as well as shed light on new drug targets that may be used to treat preterm labor.
Eligibility Criteria: Female volunteers ages 18-44 years who are pregnant, at 37+ weeks of gestation, and are scheduled for cesarean delivery.
Study Status: Opening soon.
Principal Investigators: Douglas Kniss, PhD, and William Ackerman IV, PhD Contacts: Dr. Kniss, kniss.1@osu.edu; Dr. Ackerman, William.Ackerman@osumc.edu
Funding: Internal
 
Title: Plasma Membrane Repair Mechanisms in Placental Trophoblasts
Purpose: To define the roles of dysferlin and myoferlin in trophoblast plasma membrane repair.
Description: The human placenta is a vital organ for the fetus during pregnant, and normal placental function requires that its cells undergo a continuous process of fusion, shedding and repair. We have identified two proteins, dysferlin and myoferlin, that may be essential for these fusion, shedding and repair processes. By studying how these proteins contribute to placental function, we will gain further understanding of placental diseases that may affect the well being of the fetus and pregnant women.
Eligibility Criteria: Female volunteers ages 18-44 years who are pregnant, at 37+ weeks of gestation, and are scheduled for cesarean delivery. This study only requires the collection of the placenta after delivery.
Study Status: Open.
Principal Investigator: John Robinson, PhD Contact: William Ackerman, PhD, William.Ackerman@osumc.edu
Funding: NIH
 
Title: Decidual Cell Expression of Natural Killer Cell Recruiting Chemokines in Normal Pregnancy and Pre-eclampsia
Purpose: To study the chemokine expression in decidual natural killer (dNK) cells.
Description: First trimester human endometrium (decidua) comprises primarily decidual cells (50%) and an immune cell population (40%) dominated by CD56brightCD16- decidual natural killer (dNK) cells (70%) and macrophages (20%). Incubation of first trimester decidual cells with NK cell-derived interferon gamma (IFNγ) plus macrophage-derived tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a) synergistically enhance mRNA and protein expression of chemokines that recruit CXCR3-expressing NK cells, IP-10 and ITAC. This synergy requires IFNγ receptor (IFNγR1 and IFNγR2) mediation. Immunostaining of first trimester decidua localized high expression of IP-10, ITAC, IFNγR1 and R2 to vimentin-positive decidual cells. Flow cytometry identified high CXCR3 levels in dNK cells and the minority circulating CD56brightCD16- NK cells and intermediate levels in the majority CD56dimCD16+ NK cells. Incubation with IP-10 or ITAC produced concentration-dependent enhanced CXCR3 levels and migration of both circulating NK cell subsets. However, CXCR3 expression and NK cell migration were inhibited at high IP-10 and ITAC levels. dNK cells express pregnancy-promoting genes absent from either peripheral subset, suggesting that differentiation follows recruitment. Compared with gestational age-matched controls, in pre-eclampsia, a leading cause of maternal-fetal morbidity and mortality: 1) immunohistochemical staining of decidua found significantly lower dNK cell numbers and higher IP-10 in decidual cells; and 2) IP-10 levels are significantly higher in first trimester plasma from patients eventually developing pre-eclampsia. Decidual cell-mediated crosstalk between dNK cell- and macrophage-derived paracrine factors enhances IP-10 and ITAC expression to recruit additional circulating NK cells to the decidua; excess IP-10 leads to lower dNK cell numbers in pre-eclampsia.
Eligibility Criteria: Not applicable.
Study Status: Closed.
Principal Investigator: Charles Lockwood, MD Contacts: Dr. Lockwood, Charles.Lockwood@osumc.edu, and Frederick Schatz, MD, Frederick.Schatz@osumc.edu
Funding: NIH
 
Title: Functional Progesterone Withdrawal in Decidua Mediates Abruption-Associated Preterm Delivery
Purpose: To examine levels of functional progesterone in decidual cells, both in situ and in vitro, in relation to preterm delivery.
Description: In most placental mammals, high endogenous progesterone levels maintain myometrial quiescence and declining plasma progesterone levels initiate labor. However, during human labor, placental progesterone production and plasma progesterone levels remain elevated. Moreover, human labor is induced by administration of a progesterone receptor (PR) antagonist, suggesting initiation by “functional P4 withdrawal” mediated by lower PR levels. Placental abruption (decidual hemorrhage), a leading cause of preterm delivery (PTD), is accompanied by excess thrombin derived from decidual cell expressed tissue factor. Immunostaining of placentas from abruption-associated PTD versus gestational-age matched controls revealed that among the cells at the maternal fetal interface, PR levels are significantly and exclusively lower in decidual cell nuclei in the abruption specimens. Lower PR levels are accompanied by significantly higher levels of the cell, signaling mediator phospho-ERK1/2 in decidual cells of abruption versus control decidua, whereas total ERK 1/2 is unchanged. Complementing these in situ observations, immunoblotting demonstrated that incubation of cultured third trimester human decidual cells with thrombin or medproxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) reduced and that MPA + thrombin further reduced PR expression. Thrombin also reduced PR binding to DNA and 3H-progesterone binding to PR while enhancing phospho-ERK1/2, but not total ERK1/2. Taken together, in situ and in vitro observations suggest that functional P4 withdrawal reflecting reduced PR expression in decidual cells mediates abruption-associated PTD.
Eligibility Criteria: Not applicable.
Study Status: Closed.
Principal Investigator: Charles Lockwood, MD Contacts: Dr. Lockwood, Charles.Lockwood@osumc.edu, and Frederick Schatz, PhD, Frederick.Schatz@osumc.edu
Funding: NIH
 

Gynecology Clinical Trials and Studies

 
Title: A Randomized, International, Double-Blinded (With In-House Blinding), Controlled With GARDASIL™, Dose-Ranging, Tolerability, Immunogenicity and Efficacy Study of a Multivalent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) L1 Virus-Like Particle (VLP) Vaccine Administered to 16- to 26-Year-Old Women
Purpose: To evaluate the best dose among those studied, of a 9-valent HPV vaccine, and then to study this dose for additional tolerability and immunogenicity and for efficacy.
Description: In Part A of this study, healthy 16- to 26-year-old women were randomized in equal numbers to one of three experimental 9-valent HPV vaccine formulations or the comparator GARDASIL™. The experimental vaccine was a three-dose regimen. The best 9-valent experimental HPV vaccine dose was selected for Part B of this study. During Part B, approximately 13,000 additional healthy 16- to 26-year-old women were randomized in equal numbers to the selected 9-valent HPV experimental vaccine chosen from Part A or the comparator GARDASIL™.
Eligibility Criteria: Women were included in this study if they were 16 – 26 years old and in good physical health. The women had a history of normal Pap test results or no history of Pap testing. Women were excluded if they had a history of HPV or ever received a marketed HPV vaccine in the past.
Study Status: Closed to enrollment – in follow-up.
Principal Investigator: Deborah Bartholomew, MD
Contact: Kathy Martin, RN, MS, CNP - Clinical Research Specialist, Certified Nurse Practitioner Kathryn.martin@osumc.edu
Funding: Merck & Company, Inc.
 

Gynecologic Oncology Clinical Trials and Studies

 
Title: Role of Myoferlin in Biology of Women’s Cancers
Purpose: To identify the function of myoferlin in the biology of women’s cancers (breast, ovarian, sarcoma, etc.).
Description: We will utilize in vitro cell culture-based and in vivo mice-based experiments to elucidate the role(s) of myoferlin in breast/ovarian/etc. cell biology, such as adhesion, migration, invasion and metastasis. Myoferlin is a member of a family of human proteins previously primarily studied in the context of muscle development and myopathies. Our lab is the first group to investigate its role in cancer. The data from this project will be used to further the understanding of breast cancer and the potential role of myoferlin as a therapeutic target.
Eligibility Criteria: Not applicable, as this is a laboratory research study and does not involve recruitment of patients.
Study Status: Not applicable.
Principal Investigators: Douglas Kniss, PhD, and William Ackerman IV, PhD Contacts: Dr. Kniss, kniss.1@osu.edu, and Dr. Ackerman, William.Ackerman@osumc.edu
Funding: Internal and NSF Chemical, Bioengineering, Environmental, and Transport Systems (CBET) #1134201
 
Note: More Gynecologic Oncology clinical trials and studies can be found in the OSU Comprehensive Cancer Center – James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute clinical trials database. Go to the cancer clinical trials database and click on “Search by Disease Type” and choose “Gynecologic.”
 
 
​​​​​
​​​​​​