BurgoonJennifer

Assistant Professor-Clinical

Background

Dr. Burgoon is an Assistant Professor – Clinical in the Division of Anatomy in the Department of Biomedical Education & Anatomy within the College of Medicine at The Ohio State University – Columbus Campus. She joined the division in August 2008. Dr. Burgoon is the Director of Undergraduate Education for the Division of Anatomy, as well as the Course Director for Anatomy 2300 Human Anatomy during the autumn and spring semesters. Anatomy 2300 is a large undergraduate anatomy cadaver-based course offered by the division, which serves over 1300 undergraduate students per year.

She also teaches histology to dental, medical, and graduate students, as well as leads the research seminar for the anatomy graduate students. Dr. Burgoon also serves as the Assistant Graduate Studies Chair for the Division of Anatomy. Dr. Burgoon is a dedicated educator and has developed a number of courses now being offered by the division. Dr. Burgoon embodies the service mission of the university in her involvement on a number of local and national committees, including as Co-Chair of the Testing Committee for the Human Anatomy and Physiology Society (HAPS). Her research focuses on the anatomical self-efficacy of medical students and developing teaching resources, as well as examining the role of undergraduate anatomy education in the preparation of students for professional programs.

Education and Training

Ph.D., Education (Educational Psychology, Measurement, and Evaluation) University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, August 2008

M.S., Cell Biology and Anatomy University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, August 2001

B.S., Biology Baldwin Wallace University (formerly Baldwin Wallace College), June 1996

Publications

Burgoon, J.M. & Quinn, M.M. (2014) Best practices in multiple choice question writing and item analysis for undergraduate instructors. HAPS Educator, Vol. 18, no. 3:42.

Hensley, L.C., Kirkpatrick, K.M., and Burgoon, J.M. (2013) Relation of gender, course enrollment, and grades to distinct forms of academic dishonesty. Teaching in Higher Education, Vol. 18, no. 8:895-907.

Burgoon, J.M., Meece, J.L., & Granger, N.A. (2012) Self-efficacy’s influence on student academic achievement in the medical anatomy curriculum. Anatomical Sciences Education, 5(5), 249-255.