Name: Ginny Bumgardner

Email: ginny.bumgardner@osumc.edu

Department: Surgery, Division of Transplantation

Lab Manager/Dept Contact: Jason Zimmerer

Lab Manager/Dept Contact Email: jason.zimmerer@osumc.edu

Preferred method of Contact: Lab Manager/Dept Contact Email

Previous Mentoring: Yes (funded)

Research Description: The laboratory focuses on research relevant to transplant immunobiology, using experimental models of pancreatic islet and hepatocyte (liver cell) transplantation.

Specific areas of Research Emphasis: Immunology; Transplantation


Name: Chuanxi Cai

Email: chuanxi.cai@osumc.edu

Department: Surgery

Preferred method of Contact: Faculty Email

Previous Mentoring: Yes (not funded)

Category of Research: Translational

Research Description: As a promising regenerative medicine, cell therapy with human cardiac progenitor cells (hCPCs) is greatly limited by many obstacles. The major barriers include poor donor cell survival and cell aging/senescence, which need to be overcome before this therapy can be successfully implemented. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have now been shown to play important biological roles in a variety of cell types. The role of lncRNAs in hCPCs, however, is essentially unknown. Our recent research effort has found a novel lncRNA (named as COIND) in hCPCs, and the expression of COIND is associated with the aging/senescence of hCPCs. Therefore, the focus of the current project is to restore the regenerative potential of aging hCPCs through targeting a novel lncRNA. In this project, we will answer three questions:

  1. Is the expression of COIND in hCPCs associated with their regenerative capability? The gain- or loss-of-function study for COIND will be performed to answer this question. COIND-overexpressed hCPCs will be tested in an immune-deficient mouse myocardial infarction model.
  2. What is the molecular mechanism for COIND mediated hCPC regenerative potential? The functional interaction domains on COIND and NRF2 will be mapped to address this question, and disrupt their interaction will be tested for the function of hCPCs.
  3. Will COIND enhance the endogenous myocardial repair in infarcted animal models? We will answer this question by employing the transgenic mouse model harboring a 129-kb bacterial artificial chromosome expressing human COIND.

Fulfillment of the above studies is expected to define COIND as a key factor of redox homeostasis and cell senescence, and contribute to a better understanding of cardiac regeneration and redox regulation through a novel viewpoint of lncRNA. Since lncRNAs can be chemically modified and delivered as a drug for therapy, the success of the project will also have a positive impact to build healthier lives by providing a novel treatment strategy for enhancing the effectiveness of CPC therapy in patients with heart failure.

Specific areas of Research Emphasis: Aging, Heart Disease, and RNA biology


Name: Daniel Eiferman

Email: daniel.eiferman@osumc.edu

Department: Surgery

Lab Manager/Dept Contact: Danella Jolly

Lab Manager/Dept Contact Email: Danella.Jolly@osumc.edu

Preferred Method of Contact: Faculty Email

Previous Mentoring: No

Category of research: Translational

Research Description: Our research efforts are focused on the safety and efficacy of Natural Orifice Translumenal Endoscopic Surgery (NOTES), innovative bariatric surgery, resolution of co-morbid conditions in the bariatric population, treatment and resolution of GERD and Barrett's Esophagus, and analysis of surgical outcomes data. Moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI) elicits immediate inflammatory events in the brain associated with acute cognitive, motor, and behavioral impairments. There is mounting clinical evidence that increased brain inflammation after TBI underlies both immediate as well as long-term complications. To date, however, there are no effective pro-active treatment strategies for TBI. In a mouse model of fluid percussion injury (FPI) we show that a moderate TBI promotes microglia activation, neuroinflammation (e.g., cytokine expression, macrophage trafficking, edema) and acute complications in motor coordination and behavior. Thus, our primary objective is to attenuate TBI-induced inflammation using a safe, effective, and expedient therapy. We propose intervention with methlene blue (MB) immediately after TBI will reduce neuroinflammation and improve the functional recovery. MB is an anti-inflammatory agent that is used clinically for the treatment of sepsis and ischemia. We show preliminary data that intravenous (IV) infusion of MB reduced brain edema and attenuated microglial activation (IL-1β expression) 24 h after TBI. These reductions were associated with improvement in TBI-induced deficits in motor coordination, locomotion and behavior evident up to one week after TBI. Our preliminary data also indicate that MB IV therapy reduced the presence of primed (MHC II+) microglia in the brain 30 days post injury (dpi). Therefore, goal of this investigation is to determine the degree to which immediate intervention with MB (25 minutes after injury) limits TBI-induced neuroinflammation, acute cognitive/behavioral impairments, and development of primed microglia.

Specific areas of Research Emphasis: Trauma; Immunology; Neuroscience


Name: Renzhi Han

Email: renzhi.han@osumc.edu

Department: Surgery

Lab Manager: Erin Haggard

Lab Manager Email: erin.haggard@osumc.edu

Lab Manager/Dept Contact Phone: 614-293-6313

Preferred Method of Contact: Faculty Email

Previous Mentoring: No (never applied)

Category of research: Translational

Research Description: Dr. Han's research focuses on genetic diseases affecting skeletal muscle and heart. His laboratory investigates the molecular mechanisms underlying muscular dystrophy and associated cardiomyopathy, and develops novel genome-editing therapies for treating them.

Specific areas of Research Emphasis: Heart Disease, Molecular Virology, Gene Therapy, and Musculoskeletal Disorders


Name: Zhiwei Hu

Email: zhiwei.hu@osumc.edu

Department: Surgery

Lab Manager/Dept Contact Phone: 614-685-4693

Preferred Method of Contact: Faculty Email

Previous Mentoring: No (never applied)

Category of research: Translational

Research Description: I Zhiwei Hu, MD, PhD, is a member of the Translational Therapeutics Program at the OSUCCC-James, where his research focuses on identifying novel oncotargets in tumor microenviroment and developing corresponding targeted therapies, including immunotherapy, photodynamic therapy and gene therapy. He has more than 20 years of experience in tumor immunology, antibody immunotherapy and neovascular-targeting therapies.

Dr. Hu came to Ohio State from Yale University. During his tenure at Yale, he and Alan Garen, Phd, co-invented and tested the first TF-targeting agent, a factor VII-IgG1Fc immunoconjugate (called ICON) with the ability to targer cancer cells, cancer stem cells and tumor neovasculature for the treatment of solid cancers. Dr. Hu holds five U.S. patents and twenty foreign patents for ICON and its uses. As a neovascular-targeting agent, ICON has shown therapeutic efficacy in preclinical studies for treating angiogenesis-dependent diseases, notable cancer, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and endometriosis. ICON has entered clincal trials for patients with macular degeneration ((Phase II) or with ocular melanoma (Phase I).

In 2010, Dr. Hu co-developed another neovascular-targeting therapeutic, called factor VII-targeted PDT (fVII-tPDT), for cancer and wet macular degeneration. Recently, he invented a second-generation TF-targeting ICON (called L-ICON) that hasserveral improvements, making it more effective than first generation ICON for immunotherapy and photodynamic therapy as monotherapy and combination therapies with immune modulatory agents and natural killer cells into the clinic for cancer patients with difficult-to-treat malignancies, including triple-negative breast cancer and advanced melanoma.

Specific areas of Research Emphasis: Cancer therapy; Immunology; Molecular Virology and Gene Therapy


Name: Kyle Perry

Email: kyle.perry@osumc.edu

Department: Department of Surgery, Division of General and Gastrointestinal Surgery, Center for Minimally Invasive Surgery

Lab Manager/Dept Contact: Rebecca Dettorre

Lab Manager/Dept Contact Email: becky.dettorre@osumc.edu

Lab Manager/Dept Contact Phone: 614-293-8549

Preferred Method of Contact: Lab Manager/Dept Contact Email

Previous Mentoring: Yes (funded)

Category of Research: Clinical

Research Description: Medical students have worked on a variety of research projects in the past with General Surgery mentors, including translational, clinical trials, and outcomes research. Cohort studies may be designed, performed, and completed by a medical student with input by his/her surgeon mentor and research staff. Our surgeons are particularly concerned with patient outcomes, minimally invasive surgery techniques, cost, and obesity treatment.

Specific areas of Research Emphasis: Anesthesia/Surgery; Patient outcomes, cost