2021 Archived Media 

Looking to keep up a New Year’s resolution? Experts say it’s best to start small

December 29, 2021 | Columbus Dispatch
Online audience: 495,461
Print audience: 84,419
CNET
Online audience: 33.6 million
It’s the start of 2022, which for many in the Greater Columbus area and across the country means once again setting New Year’s resolutions. So for those who want to keep up their resolutions this year, experts say to start small. Sophie Lazarus is quoted.


Restricting supply alone is not the answer to the opioid crisis

December 28, 2021 | Clinical Pain Advisor
Online audience: 18,086
The current system to address the U.S. opioid epidemic is not ideal. Policies and guidelines have focused primarily on reducing opioid prescribing and restricting supply. However, the opioid crisis requires new approaches to prescription opioid management, according to a special article published in the journal Anesthesiology. Dr. Orman Trent Hall is quoted. 


Risk score combination more accurately predicts suicidal behavior

December 10, 2021 | Healio
Online audience: 691,485
Adding Suicide Cognitions Scale questions to the commonly used Public Health Questionnaire-9 improved the accuracy of suicide risk screening in primary care clinics, data show. Craig J. Bryan is quoted.


CBT: A way to reshape your negative thinking and reduce stress

Novmeber 27, 2021 | CNN
Online audience: 47.7 million
Wouldn't you like to stop your stressful, anxious thinking in its tracks? Turns out you can, and while you're at it, you can make yourself feel and act better too. That's the basis of cognitive behavioral therapy, which burst onto the psychological scene in the 1960s and has been gathering accolades ever since. Jay Fournier and Kristen Carpenter are quoted.


Adele’s album just dropped: Why her sad songs make us feel so good

November 23, 2021 | Everyday Health
Online audience: 3.9 million
Adele’s long-awaited, just-released album 30 is the latest breakup album to top the charts, in good company with another romance-gone-wrong classic, Taylor Swift’s Red. Variety reported this week that the British icon’s new album is now the top-seller of the year, just three days after its release. If you’re wondering why the moody ballads are striking a chord for you right now, mental health experts may have the answer. Arianna Galligher is quoted. 


More than just downtime and a meal: Thanksgiving poses stressful time for students

November 23, 2021 | The Lantern
Online audience: 69,421
Newsbreak (via The Lantern)
Online audience: 2.2 million
The holiday season’s planning, travel and emotional burdens present a challenge to the population as a whole. Kristen Carpenter is quoted.  


What is adjustment disorder?

November 17, 2021 | U.S. News & World Report
Online audience: 15 million
WTOP-FM (via U.S. News & World Report)
Online audience: 1.2 million
Everyone has stress in their lives. But for some people, a specific traumatic episode or major life change can lead to a mental health problem called adjustment disorder. Justin Baker is quoted.


Support, hope exist for young adults struggling with mental health

November 16, 2021 | Columbus Dispatch
Print audience: 84,419 | Online audience: 495,461
In a guest column, Jeffrey Schottenstein writes: When I was a freshman at Ohio State, the anxiety and depression that began to manifest as a teenager intensified to the point that, even on a campus surrounded by thousands of people, I felt helpless and alone. Dr. K. Luan Phan is mentioned. 


The pandemic didn’t increase suicides. That shouldn’t be a surprise

November 16, 2021 | STAT
Online audience: 1.7 million
Craig Bryan writes, "In the early stages of the Covid-19 pandemic, mental health experts and members of the media predicted that the pandemic and its effects on society may lead to an uptick in suicides."


Ohio State raises suicide prevention awareness through open dialogue

November 15, 2021 | The Lantern
Online audience: 69,421
WOSU/NPR 
Broadcast audience: 108,100
Daily Advent
Audience not available
The Wexner Medical Center at Ohio State is partnering with Ohio State’s Harding Hospital and the Department of Psychiatry and Behavorial Health at the Ohio State College of Medicine to raise awareness for suicide prevention. Dr. K. Luan Phan and Craig Bryan are quoted. This coverage resulted from pitching efforts by WMC Media Relations.


Suicide rates declined again in 2020, but not for all groups, CDC report shows

November 3, 2021 | NBC News
Online audience: 17.4 million
In the early days of the pandemic, there were fears that the anxiety, isolation and financial uncertainty would lead to a rise in suicide. Instead, after two decades of rising suicide rates in the U.S., the number of deaths by suicide declined in 2020 for the second year in a row, according to preliminary federal data published Wednesday. Craig Bryan is quoted.


PTSD and fireworks season: 5 ways to cope with booms and bright lights
June 30, 2021 | Everyday Health
Online audience: 3.9 million

Summer often brings with it bright and booming fireworks shows, especially on patriotic holidays like the Fourth of July. Yet as beautiful as these light displays are, they can be triggering for people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Craig Bryan is quoted.


Anxious as we transition out of the pandemic? That’s common and can be treated, experts say
June 29, 2021 | CNN
Online audience: 47.7 million

America is in celebratory mode. States are dropping COVID-19 restrictions, plane travel is breaking records, and many Americans are gearing up to celebrate summer as if the last year plus of pandemic madness never happened. Kristen Carpenter is quoted.


Bipolar medications and weight gain: What to know
June 28, 2021 | U.S. News & World Report
Online audience: 15 million
MSN (via U.S. News & World Report)
Online audience: 67.2 million
Yahoo! (via U.S. News & World Report)
Online audience: 149.3 million

A 2018 survey conducted by the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance of nearly 900 people with bipolar disorder or depression found that weight gain was the side effect that most often led people to stop taking a medication. Dr. Samar McCutcheon and Dr. Douglas Misquitta are quoted.


What Is adjustment disorder?
June 23, 2021 | U.S. News & World Report
Online audience: 15 million

Everyone has stress in their lives. But for some people, a specific traumatic episode or major life change can lead to a mental health problem called adjustment disorder. Justin Baker is quoted.


Is depression genetic or environmental?
June 15, 2021 | U.S. News & World Report
Online audience: 15 million
Yahoo! News (via U.S. News & World Report)
Online audience: 36.1 million

If you've been experiencing more feelings of anxiety or depression lately, you're definitely not alone. A 2021 report from KFF found that during the pandemic, 4 in 10 adults in the U.S. reported symptoms of anxiety or depressive disorder, up from 1 in 10 who reported those symptoms from January to June 2019. Jay Fournier is quoted.


6 surprising signs you may have anxiety
June 7, 2021 | U.S. News & World Report
Online audience: 15 million
MSN (via U.S. News & World Report)
Online audience: 67.2 million
Yahoo! (via U.S. News & World Report)
Online audience: 149.3 million

Anxiety – as it refers to a set of disorders including social anxiety disorder and generalized anxiety disorder, affects more than 18% of the U.S. adult population each year. That makes it the most common mental illness in the country, according to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America. Lawrence Needleman and Dr. Zachary Kelm are quoted.


What is 'toxic masculinity'? How we define what it means to be a man affects violence, relationships
June 3, 2021 | Columbus Dispatch
Online audience: 495,461
Print audience: 84,419

Few things are as ingrained in American culture as the concept of what it means to be "a man." Ask any man, and they'll likely all say that from an early age, they've been told variations of the same lessons and expectations. Dr. Douglas Misquitta is quoted.


13 easy phrases that will help you set healthy boundaries
May 27, 2021 | The Healthy
Online audience: 843,633
MSN (via The Healthy)
Online audience: 67.2 million

Healthy boundaries are crucial to our mental health, and most of us know we should set them. The tricky part: learning how to say no without worrying we'll lose friends or anger family. Arianna Galligher is quoted.


How to manage intrusive thoughts — a common phenomena of upsetting, unwanted thoughts that won't go away
May 14, 2021 | INSIDER
Online audience: 8.8 million
MSN India (via INSIDER)
Online audience: 67.2 million

If you're distracted by unwanted and upsetting notions, ideas, or images that arise spontaneously and are difficult to get rid of, you may be having intrusive thoughts. Intrusive thoughts are time-consuming and cause significant distress that can impair your ability to function normally. It's common to have unwelcome thoughts, but intrusive thoughts may be caused by a mental health disorder. Lawrence Needleman is quoted.


The science behind why people have missed traveling
May 13, 2021 | Boston Globe
Online audience: 2.1 million

There’s science behind why people missed travel so much and are returning to it so eagerly. Travel forces the brain to do such things as navigate unfamiliar places or communicate in other languages, for example, which research shows can bolster creativity and focus. It disrupts routine and exposes people to new things, activating the naturally occurring “feel-good” neurochemical dopamine, which boosts mood and motivation. Ken Yeager is quoted.


Treating Bipolar 1 and Bipolar 2 Disorders
May 5, 2021 | U.S. News & World Report
Online audience: 15 million
MSN (via U.S. News & World Report)
Online audience: 67.2 million

We've all experienced the highs and lows of life, from the occasional blue mood to the euphoria that comes with a big accomplishment or happy experience. But many people spend a large portion of their lives in a middle ground zone, where stable mood and predictable behaviors are the status quo. Dr. Samar McCutcheon is quoted.


Returning to the office after COVID could be stressful
April 24, 2021 | Voice of America
Online audience: 2.3 million

Now that half of all U.S. adults have received at least one COVID-19 vaccine shot, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, millions of Americans who’ve worked from home during the pandemic are starting to wonder if they’ll be called back to the office anytime soon. It’s a switch up that comes at a time when many are already experiencing higher-than-normal feelings of stress and anxiety. Kristen Carpenter is quoted.


Handshakes? Hugs? How to Navigate the New COVID Etiquette After Vaccines
April 20, 2021 | Wall Street Journal
Print audience: 994,600
Online audience: 11.7 million

As people soldiered through months of the pandemic, they got accustomed to COVID-era social etiquette: distancing, masking, avoiding contact. But now as vaccinations rise, expectations around social interactions are changing again—and nobody knows how to navigate them. Dr. K. Luan Phan is quoted.


12 Proven Strategies to Stop Overthinking and Ease Anxiety Now
March 24, 2021 | U.S. News & World Report
Online audience: 15 million
Yahoo! News (via U.S. News & World Report)
Online audience: 36.1 million

What if I said the wrong thing? How will I ever finish the assignment in time? Why isn’t he responding to my text? Thoughts like these make us human. “However, we often find ourselves stuck in a spiral of predicting, playing out different scenarios and often catastrophizing,” says Sophie Lazarus, a psychologist at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in Columbus.


How's Your Mental Health? 1 Year Into Pandemic, Experts Offer Advice
March 11, 2021 | Today.com
Online audience: 6 million
MSN (via Today.com)
Online audience: 67.2 million

Exactly one year ago, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the coronavirus a global pandemic. In following months, millions of people around the world contracted the disease, and more than 2.5 million people were killed by the virus; more than 500,000 of those deaths were in the United States alone. It's no surprise that these major changes had a serious impact on the country's collective mental health. Dr. K. Luan Phan is quoted.


AP-NORC Poll: 1 In 5 In US Lost Someone Close In Pandemic
March 11, 2021 | ABC News (+ 12 outlets via AP)
Online audience: 13.9 million

A new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research illustrates how the stage is set for a two-tiered recovery. But people still in mourning express frustration at the continued struggle to stay safe. Dr. K. Luan Phan is quoted.


30% of COVID Survivors May Have PTSD: 'This Is A Very Scary Experience For The Patients'
February 26, 2021 | Yahoo!
Online audience: 149.3 million

A new study published in JAMA Psychiatry found that more than 30 percent of COVID-19 survivors may develop PTSD (posttraumatic stress disorder) — a mental health condition that is triggered by a traumatic event and hallmarked by flashbacks of the trauma, nightmares and severe anxiety. Arianna Galligher is quoted.


How to Improve Your Mood During Stressful Times
February 11, 2021 | Columbus Monthly
Audience: 21,935

There wasn’t a lot to love about 2020. Stockpiling sanitizer, disinfecting groceries and settling for smiles on Zoom rather than seeing them in person became pile-on stressors in an already unsettling time. Sophie Lazarus is quoted.


Marijuana Abuse By Youth With Mood Disorders Linked To Suicide Attempts, Self-Harm And Death, Study Finds
January 21, 2021 | CNN (+ 23 outlets)
Online audience: 49 million
MedicineNet (via HealthDay)
Online audience: 3.9 million

Heavy use of marijuana by teens and young adults with mood disorders -- such as depression and bipolar disorder -- is linked to an increased risk of self-harm, suicide attempts and death, a new study has found. Cynthia Fontanella is quoted. This coverage resulted from pitching efforts and a multimedia release distributed by OSUWMC Media Relations.


Opinion: Veteran Suicides — Here's How We Help
Jnauary 10, 2021 | The Hill
Online audience: 8 million

Dr. Craig Bryan writes… President Donald Trump recently signed into law Senate Bill 785, a bipartisan legislation aimed at improving health care for and reducing suicide rates among American veterans. The bill isn’t a magic bullet that will solve all of our problems, but it provides us with an excellent opportunity to talk about suicide among veterans, an important topic that is too rarely in the spotlight.


The Psychological Reason It’s So Hard To Work Today After The Riot — And How To Cop
January 7, 2021 | CNBC
Online audience: 19.2 million

People across the country are still reeling after pro-Trump rioters violently stormed the U.S. Capitol Wednesday. Many are feeling nervous, anxious, distracted, in a fog or overwhelmed. And many are wondering how to focus on work when nothing feels certain. Arianna Galligher is quoted.

Ohio State Expert: This New Year, Resolve To Give Yourself A Break
December 9, 2020 | WABG-TV

New Year’s Day is typically a time to make resolutions, such as exercising more, eating better or losing weight. But this year, mental health experts at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center say making such major New Year’s resolutions during these chaotic times can add more stress and be counterproductive. Instead, take some time to reset, focusing on what you can do to take better care of yourself in 2021. Sophie Lazarus is quoted. This coverage resulted from pitching efforts and a multimedia release distributed by OSUWMC Media Relations.

 

 

2020 Archived Media 


How Less Light In Fall And Winter Affects Our Emotions
November 5, 2020 | Spectrum News (Cleveland)

Our sunset is getting earlier and earlier with each passing day and as we move to mid and late fall the seemingly shorter days in longer nights may keep us inside more. And there are other effects that the dwindling amount of sunlight can have. We’ll break down why less light can wreak havoc on us emotionally in more ways than one. Sophie Lazarus is quoted.


Keeping Peace Amidst Different Political Views During Election Season
October 21, 2020 | WKOW-TV

This election season has divided the country like no other. "Our country is divided more than ever," said Dr. K. Luan Phan, a psychiatrist at Ohio State University's Wexner Medical Center. Opposing views can not only impact your mental health, but can sever friendships or damage relationships between family members.


Gen Z Is the Most Stressed Out Group in America, Poll Finds
October 20, 2020 | Newsweek

The American Psychological Association's (APA) Stress in American 2020 report revealed that, on average, Gen Z adults scored their stress levels in the past month as 6.1 out of 10, with 10 being the highest level. The average across all adults was 5. Ken Yeager is quoted.


Youth suicide rates were escalating pre-pandemic. Here's how to keep the coronavirus crisis from making it worse
AOL

September is National Suicide Prevention Month, an annual U.S. campaign to raise awareness for suicide, and National Suicide Prevention Week, a dedicated time “to share resources and stories,” runs from Sunday to Saturday. Amid rising suicide rates among youth and the mental health threats posed by the coronavirus pandemic, experts are sharing tips for helping teens and children. Craig Bryan is quoted.


Timely follow-up reduces suicide risk for youths discharged from psychiatric hospital
Healio

Youths who received outpatient mental health follow-up within 1 week of psychiatric hospital discharge appeared at reduced risk for suicide in the immediate period after discharge, according to study results published in JAMA Network Open. Cynthia A. Fontanella is quoted.


Study: Google Searches For Anxiety Symptoms Are Up During Pandemic
August 27, 2020 | WCAX-TV

From COVID-19 to job insecurity to social distancing to protests against racial inequality, 2020 hasn’t been easy. “All those things, I think, are waves of pandemics that are increasingly building upon one another,” according to Dr. K. Luan Phan, who heads the department of psychiatry and behavioral health at Ohio State University’s Wexner Medical Center.


Health Effects of Unemployment
July 24, 2020 | U.S. News & World Report

Since the coronavirus pandemic was declared in mid-March, many Americans have suffered job losses. As of this writing, the national unemployment rate stands at 11.1%, and some 17,750,000 people are unemployed. This paints a bleak economic picture as a whole, but individually, it could have far reaching health impacts too. Dr. K. Luan Phan is quoted.

Ohio State Professor Helps Create Child Care Fund for Black Women
The Columbus Dispatch - August 6, 2020 | Read full article

The effort hopes to help change the statistics that show that many women drop out of medical or science fields soon after having their first child. Tamar Gur, MD, is quoted.


Bipolar Disorder Can Require 'Rapid Intervention' — All About the Illness Kanye West Faces
People - July 24, 2020 | Read full article

On Wednesday, Kim Kardashian West asked for “compassion” for Kanye West as he manages a new cycle in his bipolar disorder. The rapper, 43, has spoken openly in the past about his history with the mood disorder, which he was first diagnosed with about three years ago. Samar McCutcheon, MD, is quoted.


Health Effects of Unemployment
U.S. News & World Report - July 24, 2020 | Read full article

Since the coronavirus pandemic was declared in mid-March, many Americans have suffered job losses. As of this writing, the national unemployment rate stands at 11.1%, and some 17,750,000 people are unemployed. This paints a bleak economic picture as a whole, but individually, it could have far reaching health impacts too. K. Luan Phan, MD, is quoted.


Preventing COVID Is So Exhausting
Men’s Health - July 9, 2020 | Read full article

You’re tired of hearing about COVID-19, tired of watching out for it. If you look at scenes of packed beaches and bars, you’d say the coronavirus pandemic is wearing thin. People are just burned out on dealing with it. Doug Misquitta, MD, is quoted.


COVID-19 Pandemic Creating an Unintended Epidemic - Loneliness
WBNS-TV/10 - July 2, 2020 | Read full article

While dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic, we're also dealing with an unintended consequence - what experts are calling a "loneliness epidemic."  Even though we're using technology to stay connected, we can still feel isolated. Janice Kiecolt-Glaser, PhD, and Sophie Lazarus, PhD, are quoted.


12 Best Exercises to Ease Stress and Anxiety
U.S. News & World Report - June 19, 2020 | Read full article

Stress is a fact of life, but it can be a double-edged sword. In small doses, it can boost alertness and performance. But when you’re constantly stressed, that can have a significant downside. Chelsi Day, PsyD, is quoted.


10 Powerful Ways to Overcome Anger or a Bad Mood
U.S. News & World Report - June 5, 2020 | Read full article

You have a fight with your best friend. You don't get that promotion you wanted. You wrangle through bad traffic and bad drivers to get somewhere in a rush. All of these examples could set off anger or a bad mood. Sophie Lazarus, PhD, is quoted.


Police Brutality Imagery On Social Media Can Cause Lasting Trauma, Especially For Black People
Insider - June 3, 2020 | Read full article

Images and video of police brutality during protests are being widely disseminated on social media as people continue to protest the death of George Floyd. These images can cause trauma, especially for black people who have witnessed or experienced racist events in their own lives, experts say. Ken Yeager, PhD, is quoted. 


That Feeling You Have Might Be Situational Depression
Today - May 28, 2020 | Read full article

The COVID-19 pandemic has trapped most people in their homes and little things, like getting dressed and showering, seem less important now. Some people might lack motivation and interest in things they once loved, sleep more, become more irritable or battle insomnia. While these feelings and behaviors could be normal reactions to stress, they also could be a symptom of a more serious mental health issue. Sophie Lazarus, PhD, is quoted.


The Coronavirus Is Creating A Mental Health Crisis In America’s Workforce
HuffPost - May 27, 2020 | Read full article

Over a third of workers in the U.S. are currently struggling with mental health issues, ranging from moderate distress to serious mental illness. That’s according to a study conducted in March, just as the coronavirus pandemic was beginning to hit the country. Cheryl Carmin, PhD, is quoted.


Working From Home? Here's How To Have Job-Life Boundaries During The Pandemic
Yahoo! - May 27, 2020 | Read full article

COVID-19 has forced many people to work remotely, some for the first time ever. And despite all of the fantasies that working from home is a breeze compared to going into an office, many have found it can be the opposite. Mary Fristad, PhD, is quoted.


What to Expect When Calling a Mental Health Hotline
U.S. News & World Report - April 29, 2020 | Read full article

In times of extreme stress, crisis or a mental health emergency, where would you turn? For many people, the answer is a mental health hotline. Ken Yeager, PhD, is quoted.


COVID-19 Pushes People Into Uncomfortable Places as They Ask for Help
Spectrum News 1 - April 27, 2020 | Read full article

Millions of Americans who are used to working have recently found themselves in the tough place of being unemployed and unable to take care of their basic needs on their own. For many, the idea of not being able to do so has caused varying levels of shame and embarrassment as they now seek help from others. Travis Westbrook, PhD, is quoted.


'There's No Wrong Way To Feel': The Grief Of The Coronavirus Pandemic
Today - April 8, 2020 | Read full article

As the pandemic lingers feelings change from fear, anxiety and concern to mourning over losses and nostalgia for the mundane. K. Luan Phan, MD, is quoted. 


The Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health is proud of our esteemed faculty members because they never stop elevating the department's reputation. This is seen in part by their dedication to providing accurate medical information for news articles, blogs and more.

Ohio State Professor Helps Create Child Care Fund for Black Women
The Columbus Dispatch - August 6, 2020 | Read full article

The effort hopes to help change the statistics that show that many women drop out of medical or science fields soon after having their first child. Tamar Gur, MD, is quoted.


Bipolar Disorder Can Require 'Rapid Intervention' — All About the Illness Kanye West Faces
People - July 24, 2020 | Read full article

On Wednesday, Kim Kardashian West asked for “compassion” for Kanye West as he manages a new cycle in his bipolar disorder. The rapper, 43, has spoken openly in the past about his history with the mood disorder, which he was first diagnosed with about three years ago. Samar McCutcheon, MD, is quoted.


Health Effects of Unemployment
U.S. News & World Report - July 24, 2020 | Read full article

Since the coronavirus pandemic was declared in mid-March, many Americans have suffered job losses. As of this writing, the national unemployment rate stands at 11.1%, and some 17,750,000 people are unemployed. This paints a bleak economic picture as a whole, but individually, it could have far reaching health impacts too. K. Luan Phan, MD, is quoted.


Preventing COVID Is So Exhausting
Men’s Health - July 9, 2020 | Read full article

You’re tired of hearing about COVID-19, tired of watching out for it. If you look at scenes of packed beaches and bars, you’d say the coronavirus pandemic is wearing thin. People are just burned out on dealing with it. Doug Misquitta, MD, is quoted.


COVID-19 Pandemic Creating an Unintended Epidemic - Loneliness
WBNS-TV/10 - July 2, 2020 | Read full article

While dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic, we're also dealing with an unintended consequence - what experts are calling a "loneliness epidemic."  Even though we're using technology to stay connected, we can still feel isolated. Janice Kiecolt-Glaser, PhD, and Sophie Lazarus, PhD, are quoted.


12 Best Exercises to Ease Stress and Anxiety
U.S. News & World Report - June 19, 2020 | Read full article

Stress is a fact of life, but it can be a double-edged sword. In small doses, it can boost alertness and performance. But when you’re constantly stressed, that can have a significant downside. Chelsi Day, PsyD, is quoted.


10 Powerful Ways to Overcome Anger or a Bad Mood
U.S. News & World Report - June 5, 2020 | Read full article

You have a fight with your best friend. You don't get that promotion you wanted. You wrangle through bad traffic and bad drivers to get somewhere in a rush. All of these examples could set off anger or a bad mood. Sophie Lazarus, PhD, is quoted.


Police Brutality Imagery On Social Media Can Cause Lasting Trauma, Especially For Black People
Insider - June 3, 2020 | Read full article

Images and video of police brutality during protests are being widely disseminated on social media as people continue to protest the death of George Floyd. These images can cause trauma, especially for black people who have witnessed or experienced racist events in their own lives, experts say. Ken Yeager, PhD, is quoted. 


That Feeling You Have Might Be Situational Depression
Today - May 28, 2020 | Read full article

The COVID-19 pandemic has trapped most people in their homes and little things, like getting dressed and showering, seem less important now. Some people might lack motivation and interest in things they once loved, sleep more, become more irritable or battle insomnia. While these feelings and behaviors could be normal reactions to stress, they also could be a symptom of a more serious mental health issue. Sophie Lazarus, PhD, is quoted.


The Coronavirus Is Creating A Mental Health Crisis In America’s Workforce
HuffPost - May 27, 2020 | Read full article

Over a third of workers in the U.S. are currently struggling with mental health issues, ranging from moderate distress to serious mental illness. That’s according to a study conducted in March, just as the coronavirus pandemic was beginning to hit the country. Cheryl Carmin, PhD, is quoted.


Working From Home? Here's How To Have Job-Life Boundaries During The Pandemic
Yahoo! - May 27, 2020 | Read full article

COVID-19 has forced many people to work remotely, some for the first time ever. And despite all of the fantasies that working from home is a breeze compared to going into an office, many have found it can be the opposite. Mary Fristad, PhD, is quoted.


What to Expect When Calling a Mental Health Hotline
U.S. News & World Report - April 29, 2020 | Read full article

In times of extreme stress, crisis or a mental health emergency, where would you turn? For many people, the answer is a mental health hotline. Ken Yeager, PhD, is quoted.


COVID-19 Pushes People Into Uncomfortable Places as They Ask for Help
Spectrum News 1 - April 27, 2020 | Read full article

Millions of Americans who are used to working have recently found themselves in the tough place of being unemployed and unable to take care of their basic needs on their own. For many, the idea of not being able to do so has caused varying levels of shame and embarrassment as they now seek help from others. Travis Westbrook, PhD, is quoted.


'There's No Wrong Way To Feel': The Grief Of The Coronavirus Pandemic
Today - April 8, 2020 | Read full article

As the pandemic lingers feelings change from fear, anxiety and concern to mourning over losses and nostalgia for the mundane. K. Luan Phan, MD, is quoted. 

Share this page